Manual vs. Electric Toothbrush: Which Is Better?

Manual vs. Electric Toothbrush: Which Is Better?

Does it really matter whether you use an electric or manual toothbrush? As a matter of fact, it does. An electric toothbrush can elevate your brushing experience and help stimulate your gums while ferreting out the smallest particles of bacteria-laden food.

At Lancaster Dental Care Associates in Lancaster, California, Dr. Kamram Saidara and his dental specialists focus on patient education to help you care for your teeth at home. That includes making the best choices when it comes to your toothbrush, toothpaste, and floss.

The why of brushing

Brushing your teeth is good for your oral and overall health. It helps whisk away a sticky film called plaque. The problem with plaque is it can quickly calcify into tartar, which breaks down your tooth enamel. Untreated plaque and tartar can cause gum infection and even tooth loss.

The how of brushing

Brushing correctly helps ease plaque from below the edge of the gumline. Dentists recommend holding your brush at a 45-degree angle and brushing gently in a circular, sweeping fashion. 

Pressing too hard can cause abrasions on your gums and cause inflammation — the opposite of what you’re trying to accomplish.

Which brush to use

An 11-year study of 2,018 patients revealed that women and men who used an electric toothbrush enjoyed better oral health than those who used a manual toothbrush. 

Benefits of using an electric toothbrush include: 

Electric toothbrush use also helped impact gum health. Users of electric toothbrushes had 22% less gum recession and 18% less tooth decay over the study period. 

A three-month study of daily toothbrushes also revealed that electric toothbrushes reduced plaque by 21% more than manual ones and reduced gingivitis by 11%.

What makes electric toothbrushes superior 

Brushes with oscillating heads rotate as they clean, breaking down plaque more efficiently. Some electric toothbrushes have a sonic function, using sound waves to help break up plaque.

Many electric toothbrushes have built-in timers. That can help you and your kids get your recommended two minutes of brush time without needing a separate device. A few brands break down the time into shorter periods so each quadrant of your mouth gets equal attention.

Some electric models even have pressure sensors. If you brush too hard, a beep lets you know to ease up on the pressure and concentrate on your technique.

In a head-to-head between manual and electric toothbrushes, electric wins hands down.

To learn more about toothbrush options or schedule an exam and dental cleaning, call our office at 661-215-8130 or request an appointment online today. 

 

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